Introducing Spot® Ex Endoscopic Tattoo

Recently published data highlights that colon cancer is becoming more common among younger patients (Siegel 2017), and new clinical guidelines have been released that recommend tattooing all lesions that need to be followed-up at future colonoscopy or surgery (Ferlitsch 2017).

Today, we’re proud to introduce our latest advance to combat these trends and implement these new guidelines — Spot® Ex Endoscopic Tattoo, available in the United States. The new Spot Ex Endoscopic Tattoo provides a permanent tattoo, enabling a lifetime of patient follow-up. Spot Ex is 50% darker than the current Spot product, making the tattoo easier-to-find and helping endoscopists and surgeons manage time and productivity pressures. 

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Trouble navigating Colonic markings endoscopically??

INTRODUCTION:

You were supposed to turn about three miles back but you don’t know that because your GPS only provides accurate distances about 5% of the time.  Wait, what?

A study by Dr. Katherine Garman, MD of Duke University Medical Center has now shown that this is the case for GI physicians trying to navigate colonic markings endoscopically.  The review of 747 patient charts showed that the current lack of standards for not only endoscopic marking practice, but also reporting, is making clear communication between providers the exception rather than the rule.

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Driving Patient Safety With Endoscopic Tattooing

INTRODUCTION:

The 1999 Institute of Medicine report found that preventable medical errors, including wrong-site surgery, caused 44,000 to 98,000 deaths each year, with an associated annual cost of $17 billion to $29 billion. Even using the conservative estimate, this placed medical errors among the leading causes of death in the United States. Fortunately, safeguards instituted over the past decade have resulted in the reduction of preventable medical errors. This article will discuss the issue of wrong-site surgery in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disease and the role of endoscopic tattooing in reducing this devastating error in care.

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Has Paracentesis Shifted Entirely to Interventional Radiology?

INTRODUCTION:

There has been a significant shift in specialty when it comes to performing large volume paracentesis (LVP). LVP procedures performed by interventional radiologists have increased significantly over the last 20 years, while the same procedures have declined significantly in gastroenterology. The techniques used for LVP have also been changing as more advanced medicines and technologies have become available. Let us know what your practice is doing.

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Paracentesis: Metal Cannula vs. Plastic Catheter

INTRODUCTION:

Physicians have varying opinons on what type of introducer to use during paracentesis: metal cannula or plastic catheter. The AASLD Practice Guideline on managing ascites says that large caliber, multi-hole metal cannulas should be used for therapeutic paracentesis. However, some physicians choose to use plastic catheters to drain ascitic fluid. Below is a comparison:

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RenovaRP Paracentesis Pump to Make Its Debut at AASLD’s The Liver Meeting

GI Supply will be joining over 9,500 hepatologists and hepatology health professionals from across the nation and around the world for AASLD’s The Liver Meeting in Boston this weekend. The company will be showcasing their RenovaRP Paracentesis pump, the next-generation of paracentesis equipment. The RenovaRP is a portable, automatic paracentesis pump that safely and effectively removes ascitic fluid from the abdominal cavity, often in less than 30 minutes.

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